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The Janus Clinic

The UK's First Neurofeedback / Biofeedback Clinic
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Specialists in Attention, Mental Performance and Stress Reduction
Depression
Depressed Person

Between 5 and 10 per cent of the population are suffering from the illness to some extent at any one time. Women are twice as likely to get depression as men. Nietzsche, Van Gogh, Hemingway, Churchill and many other distinguished people suffered from depression. Depression is often linked to alcohol abuse. It is estimated that depression contributes to half of all suicides. 80% of depressed people are not currently receiving any treatment. Standard antidepressants, SSRIs such as Prozac, Paxil (Aropax) and Zoloft, have recently been revealed to have serious risks, and are linked to suicide, violence, psychosis, abnormal bleeding and brain tumours. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has an 80% relapse rate in the long term.

The protocol we use in treating depression is a mixture of classical methods and Neurofeedback. We utilise the facts that certain cortical waves reflect the cortical inactivation and that activation asymmetry between the brain hemispheres correlates with affect (depression). Our training rebalances brain activity and thus, reduces depression with a long term positive effect.

Analysis Graph
Analysis Software

As depression is on the increase, particularly in developed countries, Neurofeedback protocols have proven to be a powerful tool for counteracting this very debilitating disorder. Antidepressants have only an 18% effect over and above placebos and are associated with significant side effects. Neurofeedback offers a non-invasive and drug free treatment alternative for depression.

Make an Enquiry
Tel / Fax: +44 (0) 1276 34822. Address: 45 Bloomsbury Way, Blackwater, Camberley, Surrey, GU17 9LY, UK.
© 2008 The Janus Clinic, all rights reserved, site privacy policy. The Janus Clinic is run by Psychology Consultants Ltd, registered 4214335, 10th May 2001, England and Wales.